Month: September 2019

Ongoing Wildfires in Brazilian and Bolivian Amazon Forests Expected to Produce Large Amounts of Tarballs

The wildfires currently engulfing the Brazilian and Bolivian sections of the Amazon Forest, with which scientists expect to see huge amounts of biomass burning that can cause greater environmental problems. That is because biomass burning (BB) produces emissions of gases and aerosol particles that can adversely impact health, visibility and cause further changes in both local and global climates.

Tarballs, the dominant and light-absorbing aerosol particles present in BB smoke are known to create a negative impact on the Earth’s climate. Yet exactly how tarballs are formed and the scope of its influence on climate change are questions that still call for clear answers.

Kouji Adachi, a senior researcher at the Meteorological Research Institute in Tsukuba, Japan, and Professor Peter Buseck of the Schools of Molecular Sciences and Earth and Space Exploration at the Arizona State University are currently collaborating on the study of tarball particles and their potential effects on climate change.

Actually, their collaboration will expand the range and diversity of Buseck’s previous research on BB burning and resulting tarball formation.

The current study conducted by Adachi and Buseck revealed tarball formation processes, as evidenced by microphysical and chemical analyses. The findings can improve interpretations of BB smoke, when captured as sattelite and ground-base data feeds. The tarball shape, compositional changes during aging, and their viscosity can furnish better estimates of their impact in climate models.

Background of Professor Buseck’s Earlier Assessments of Biomass Burning

Professor Buseck, is the recipient of this month’s 2019 Roebling Medal, the highest award bestowed for outstanding original research in mineralogy by the Mineralogical Society of America. The ASU professor and his group had previously developed a unique and interesting method in the use of transmission electron microscopy, as a means to study shapes and compositions of more than 10,000 particles.

Tarballs were analyzed for chemical compositions with the use of scanning transmissions obtained from X-ray spectroscopy. Buseck’s research team had studied tarballs collected from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) that was held in the U.S. in the summer of 2013. The purpose of which was to acquire better insights on how aerosol particles generated by biomass fires affect climate and the atmosphere.

The project estimated that about 40% of carbonaceous aerosol particles (tarballs) present in the atmosphere are results of biomass burning. The huge proportion of tarball composition in the Earth’s atmosphere has potential effects that can alter regional and global climates.

Tasball assessments revealed tarball increase in direct relation to a particle’s age. Moreover, the ratios of oxygen and nitrogen in tarball, as relative components of potassium, and a particle roundness, can also increase when a particle ages.

The Effect Of Commercial Fishing In Aquatic Environment

Fisheries and aquaculture are very diverse, and the environmental issues highlighted here are not the result of all fisheries or fish farms, but the result of seafood produced in the UK market.

Fishing: Industrial Capture

Over-fishing

Technological improvements, increased demand and poor management mean that fish species can be used under very large fishing pressures, or they can be destroyed completely. Over-fished fish include popular species such as salmon and tuna, as well as long-lasting and slow-growing species like sharks or deep-sea fish.

Habitat Damage

Heavy or large fishing gears during fishing can damage the environment. Some fishing methods, such as bottom nets can affect seabed habitat. In areas with sensitive species, such as undersea corals, fishing gear can be prolonged for damage.

Prone Variety Capture

Wild animals such as albatross, sharks, dolphins, turtles, and dolphins are caught, caught or killed by fishing methods and forced to survive in vulnerable populations.

Industrial Fishing

Fish Food

To grow carnivores such as salmon and shrimp, you need to import a large amount of fish-meal. This demand for fish food puts pressure on the wild fish used to make it. Vegetable proteins such as beans can also be used in fish foods. In some parts of the world, soybeans and other terrestrial protein crops are produced in an environmentally harmful manner.

Pollution

Waste from fish food and excreta contaminates the water and seabed around the intensive fish farm, reducing the quality of water and sediment. Chemicals and pesticides (used to control parasites and diseases on certain farms) can also contaminate the area and affect surrounding marine life.

Escape Impacts Untamed Fish Inhabitants

Farmed fish such as Atlantic salmon can escape from a group of wild fish. Farmed fish are genetically unsuitable for the environment. As a result, all cross progeny have reduced chances of survival. Escape can put pressure on wildlife and compete with wild fish for food and resources.

Habitat Damage

Sensitive natural habitats become farms that can seriously affect the environment. For example, the establishment of tropical shrimp farms has historically caused severe damage to fragile coastal habitats such as mangroves. This damage leads to the loss of beneficial ecosystem functions such as natural coastal flood protection, farm habitat and water filtration.











Benefits Using Environment-Friendly Weed Killers

If you are cultivating a good lawn outside your home, it is ideal that you should also make use of environment-friendly weed killer. Aside from it works to help the environment there are also other environments you can get from using it.

 

They say, kill the weed but not the Earth. Using very strong formulated weed killer might just be the reason of you contributing to killing the environment, while this is a pretty bad concept to do, switching to the environment-friendly killer is the ideal option.

Not only that using organic weed killer is friendly to the environment but it also gives a lot of benefits to your lawn and the plants you have in the garden. Let’s check out a few benefits!

 

Top 3 Benefits of Organic Weed Killers

For years, weed killer has been a part of nearly every neighborhood’s lawn care routine, but little did they know that they are actually putting more risks to their surroundings and their plants, basically these strong chemicals actually corrupt the healthy growth of your plants.

 

Which is why turning to organic weed killer is the key. Here are the top 3 benefits of using such:

Affects Your Health

If chemical weed killers settle on your plants, your products can be dangerous to ingest. Even if you rinse off your vegetables, non-organic solutions can seep into the soil and affect all the plants in a bed or garden.

Connects with Your Garden

Even if the landscape fabric and mulch are already in place, weeds may still make their way through. Rather using chemicals, get your garden gloves out and start pulling. Or better yet use the one that is good for the environment. Working this closely with your plants will also alert you to other problems, like root rot or pest infestations.

Saves You Money

You don’t really need to waste money on commercialized chemicals. Instead, make use of eco-friendly ones which are way cheaper. Or you can also create your own solution.  Try spraying vinegar directly on weeds, as this is a natural and safe alternative to chemicals. Take care not to spray your other plants, as the vinegar can harm them just as it does the weeds.

 

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